• Your feedback system
  • Priority Groups
  • Universal Questions
  • Specific Questions
  • Transitions
  • Coaching
  • Job Placement
  • Avoid Survey Fatigue
  • Custom Context
  • Survey Tools

Designing your feedback system

Who do we ask and what do we ask them?

This interactive tutorial will help take the first essential steps to design a simple feedback system based on the Constituent Voice™ method. When you complete the tutorial you will get an instant report to use as a guide to strengthening your organization’s feedback capabilities.

To illustrate the steps we will use examples from the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO). CEO is a leading human service organization in the USA that helps ex-offenders transition to stable jobs. CEO has agreed to share some of its experiences of setting up its own feedback system.

Over time we will add more tutorials for different perf1s of organizations, but this example will illustrate the most important principles and steps in designing a feedback system for your organization.

What type of organization do you work for? (tick all that apply)









Prioritizing constituent groups

First we need to decide what different which constituent groups can tell us about our performance to survey. CEO has four main groups without which it could not function: ex-offenders seeking work, employers, staff, and funders. There are other groups who are important -- parole agencies, policy makers, and peer organizations -- but these four are mission critical.

Eventually, CEO will want to engage all four groups, but it decided to start with its most important constituent, the service users, which it refers to as participants.

What are the mission critical groups for your organization?
Which group would you start with?

Choosing universal questions

Next, CEO created a short list of the questions that would capture the participant experience and perceptions of those aspects of its performance that most strongly influence their job prospects. These questions fall into two categories: universal and specific.

The universal questions are relevant at each different step in the CEO model, from learning life skills to mastering appropriate on-the-job attitudes and behavior. Examples of the universal questions CEO chose include:

CEO developed a set of 20 questions that cover all aspects of its year long program. This includes universal questions that are relevant at every different step in the CEO model, from learning lifeskills to mastering appropriate on-the-job attitudes and behavior. Examples of the universal questions include:

  • Are you confident CEO will help you find a job?
  • Would you recommend CEO and its services to other parolee job seekers?

Specific questions relate to the participant's experience at each distinct step in the CEO model and are introduced in the slides that follow.

Choosing specific questions

Introductions

There are four distinct phases in the CEO year-long program. The CEO Constituent Voice team thought deeply about each of these phases in its model and came up with four questions to ask at each stage.

Below and in the slides that follow we introduce one of the questions CEO asks at each stage, followed by a multiple choice question designed to explore how answers to that question could help CEO to improve its performance.

In the first week of the program participants are asked:

How well did we communicate how the CEO works?

What actionable measure will come from answers to this question?(Check all that apply)

Choosing specific questions

Transitional Work

Lifeskills graduates are immediately placed in part-time transitional work with private and public sector employers. This is often crew work under the direction of a CEO supervisor. Here is a question that participants are asked after every third day of transitional work:

Did your Supervisor listen to you and train you on the job?

What actionable measure will come from answers to this question?(Check all that apply)

Choosing specific questions

Job Coaching

Alongside transitional work assignments, participants meet with their Job Coach once a week to hone their capabilities to find and hold a permanent job. In order to be eligible to apply for permanent jobs, a participant needs to be certified as “job start ready” by the Job Coach. Here is a question that participants are asked every Job Coach session.

To what extent is my Job Coach helping me become job start ready?

What is one actionable measure that will come from answers to this question?

Choosing specific questions

Job Placement

Participants certified as “job start ready” are assigned to a Business Account Manager (BAM), who guides them to and through permanent job applications. Here is a question that participants are asked every BAM session:

Are you confident that you can perform well in a job interview?

What is one actionable measure that will come from answers to this question?

Avoiding Survey Fatigue

Frequent data collection means your constituents are often asked for feedback. How often is too often?

It depends. "Survey fatigue" -- low response rates -- is really a problem with organizations ignoring their constitutents. There is no survey response fatigue, only survey listening fatigue.

You can avoid this if you do two things:

  • First, keep any one survey very short. CEO keeps its surveys to 4 to 5 questions that take no more than one minute to complete.
  • Second, ensure your constituents know that you take their feedback seriously. People stop answering surveys when they feel there is no value in it for them.

In your organization:

Have you surveyed your primary constituents in the past year?

If yes, were you happy with the response rate on the survey?

If no, what is the main reason you have not surveyed your constituents?

Did you report back to your constituents on what you learned from the survey, including any corrective measures agreed upon?

Making up your own questions

Having seen some question examples from CEO, now lets try and think up some questions for your own organization.

Think of one constituent group that could tell you something important about your performance. With that group in mind, answer this question in the box below:

What would you hope to learn from them about your performance?

Survey tools

There are many ways to conduct surveys, from low tech approaches like interviews and paper surveys through to kiosks/mounted tablets to online to cell text messaging. Technology is making it easier and cheaper to survey people regularly.

We'd like your feedback.

What are the main ways that you collect feedback presently?
If you have one, what is your preferred tool or application?